Posts tagged "disney"


blackorchidd:

guessthelabels:

CAN YOU APPRECIATE ALL THIS BROWN

YESSS

blackorchidd:

guessthelabels:

CAN YOU APPRECIATE ALL THIS BROWN

YESSS

(Source: dmolech)

Reblogged from chizutachibana


disneysnewgroove:

Disney movies in order of historical setting

(Excludes most of the package films. Some films, eg The Lion King, are impossible to pin down exactly and some, like Aladdin and Treasure Planet, are anachronistic, so these are estimations. A few have been split into 2 if there is more than one time period in the movie, and sequels have been put together.)

Reblogged from theehokeypokey


pokeybooks13:

sadtrashbuckybarnes:

disneys-always-first:

Never not reblog

One thing that always bothered me about that picture of mulan, more than the obvious artifice which is pretty out of character, is the colour of her outfit. The general consensus seems to be that mulan took place in the Northern Wei dynasty, but during the Tang Dynasty which preceded it, the colour yellow, especially bright yellow, had become the exclusive domain of the Emperor. And in those times disrespect to the Emperor could cost you your head at best and the lives of you and your entire family at worst. So, y know, maybe don’t put her in yellow clothes.

I love the history side if tumblr

(Source: fascinationanimation)

Reblogged from toastytoastytoast


thearmada4231:

I am ashamed that I contributed to this madness

Reblogged from shootthewizard


could you talk more about the male disney villains being queer coded with stereotypes?

lierdumoa:

blue-author:

commanderbishoujo:

gadaboutgreen:

biyuti:

fandomsandfeminism:

fandomsandfeminism:

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Pink hair bows. 

Many male Disney villains are what we would call “camp.” Effeminate, vain, “wimpy” and portrayed as laughable and unlikable. Calling upon common negative stereotypes about gay men, these villains are characterized as villainous by embodying these tropes and traits. 

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Think about it: Often Thin/un-muscled figure, heavily inked and shadowed eyes (giving the impression of eyeliner and eye shadow?), stereotypically “sassy” and/or manipulative, often ends up being cowardly once on the defensive, many have comedic male sidekicks (such as Wiggins, Smee, Iago, the…snake that isn’t Kaa) 

Other examples:

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since i was talking about one of the disney man villains who doesn’t fit this stereotype yesterday…

Gaston.

my bf was listening to that song about him yesterday

and i mentioned that he is literally the most terrifying disney villain

why?

because his type of evil is banal and commonplace

there are white men walking around who are exactly like him

men who think that women are prizes they deserve

men who will not listen or pay attention to a rejection

men who will go out of their way, if rejected, to ruin a woman’s life

ppl often seem to miss this when discussion beauty and the beast since the stockholm syndrom ‘romance’ is also a giant icky thing

the terrifying thing about gaston is that he is supposed to be (as all disney villains) a hyperbolic cartoon

but he is the absolutely truest and most real villain

because he exists in the real world

we all know men like him

Also, if we’re talking about queer coded characters the MOST important of all the characters is Ursula who was bad off of a drag Queen (Divine) and has a whole host of negative stereotypes.

She’s also my favorite.

This post is sorely missing some seriously important historical context. The term for this as film history goes is the sissy, and as a stock character the sissy is probably one of the oldest archetypes in Hollywood, going back to the silent film era. Some of the most enduring stereotypes of male queerness—the limp wrist, swishing, etc—can actually be traced to the exaggerated movements of cinematic sissies in silent films. And it’s important to note sissies were portrayed in a range of ways, though they were generally used to comedic effect; queerness was considered a joke, and the modern notion of the “sassy gay friend” in films can probably be traced back to this bullshit too. It wasn’t until the Hays Code was adopted in the ’30s that sissies almost uniformly started being portrayed as villains. Homosexuality was specifically targeted under the euphemism of “sexual perversion”, and the only way it could fly under the radar in films under the strict censorship of the code was by coding villains that way in contrast to the morally upright hetero heroes. Peter Lorre’s character in The Maltese Falcon is one off the top of my head, but there are a slew of them from the ’30s onward, and this trope didn’t go away after the Code ended either. More modern examples in live action films are Prince Edward in Braveheart, Buffalo Bill in Silence of the Lambs, and Xerxes in 300.

So Disney just provides some of the most egregious modern examples of the sissy villain, but this is a really old and really gross trope that goes back years and years in Western film. There’s a fantastic book and accompanying documentary about the history of homosexuality in film by Vito Russo called The Celluloid Closet that gets into a lot of this.

It’s incredibly refreshing to see a response to a post like this that starts with “This post is sorely missing some seriously important historical context.” and then goes on to provide important historical context that adds information to the point being made. I was seriously wincing and bracing myself for “You guys, you don’t understand. It was different back then.”

(Of course, I wouldn’t have been worried if the name of the last poster hadn’t scrolled off the top of my screen by the time I got to it.)

See also: Why the new Maleficent was is so important.

Reblogged from loveitlaughatit


tillyhale:

Thought I’d join in (insp.)

Reblogged from loveitlaughatit


(Source: jumpingpuddles)

Reblogged from shootthewizard


freshest-tittymilk:

glowinthedarkgirlfriend:

The Little Mermaid TV Series: Gabriella

Remember when Disney had a cute, disabled, poc mermaid?

When i was younger, one of my best friends was a deaf guyanese girl, and her fave princess was Ariel, mainly bc she related to her living without a voice (and her love of swimming)

When this episode aired, she cried and squawked and made sounds that were almost understandable… She saw herself as a mermaid, on tv, with her favourite character of all time

Representation matters, always, no matter what

(Source: cornelia89)

Reblogged from salabwek


unf-hans:

kristoffbjorgman:

rapeculturerealities:

leonquwata:

 (x)

reblogging here for that tag.  always be wary of people who don’t respect your space.  always.

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oh

OH

(Source: thedisneyprincess)

Reblogged from myheartset


missmaceymouse:

The Disney Princesses text with their Princes. 

By missmaceymouse

Reblogged from beyond-mywildest-dreams


seraphicroyalty:

proudlyinsane:

there were a lot of great cosplays at Phoenix Comicon but I feel like this one deserves its own post
I saw this guy maybe eight times on Friday and Saturday, twice riding around on the scooter inside the magikarp, once singing I Can Show You the World. It was only Saturday night that I really looked at him and realized he was Aladdin on a Magikarp
May I present to all of you
The Magikarp-et Ride

look at my friend lou

seraphicroyalty:

proudlyinsane:

there were a lot of great cosplays at Phoenix Comicon but I feel like this one deserves its own post

I saw this guy maybe eight times on Friday and Saturday, twice riding around on the scooter inside the magikarp, once singing I Can Show You the World. It was only Saturday night that I really looked at him and realized he was Aladdin on a Magikarp

May I present to all of you

The Magikarp-et Ride

look at my friend lou

(Source: actuallyscottpilgrim)

Reblogged from temporalconundrums


(Source: ourdisneydreams)

Reblogged from rondinihoudini


micdotcom:

DreamWorks animator imagines the “Rejected Princesses” Hollywood would never touch 

While fans have taken to creating their own “racebent” versions of classic Disney characters, the question still remains: Given how many great female characters there are in history and in literature, why is Disney not willing to look outside the box?

That was the question on former DreamWorks animator Jason Porath’s mind when he launched his project “Rejected Princesses.” Describing himself as “a guy who likes interesting, lesser-known women and would like for them to get their time in the sun,” Porath decided to create Disneyfied versions of female characters who would have a hard time receiving the green light from the studio.

Read more | Follow micdotcom

Reblogged from micdotcom


gameraboy:

Vintage slides of Tomorrowland at Disney World. While some things have changed, with Mission to Mars changing to Stich’s Great Escape and America the Beautiful becoming the Monsters Inc. Laugh Floor, quite a bit is the same, especially the PeopleMover. Via Disney Pix.

Reblogged from liamdryden


Some famous movie/TV characters that you may not know have been in a Disney movie

(Source: disneydayandnight)

Reblogged from -hewastheirfriend


Patterns from Subtle Patterns (Subtle Patterns) / CC BY-SA 3.0